Mint of Virgin Islands during British occupation

During the British occupation of the Virgin Islands, which occurred sporadically during the 17th and 18th centuries, there was no official mint established on the islands. The British Virgin Islands, consisting of Tortola, Virgin Gorda, Anegada, and Jost Van Dyke, were primarily used for agriculture and as strategic naval outposts.

As such, the British Virgin Islands did not have their own currency or mint. Instead, during British occupation, the islands would have likely used British currency, including coins minted in England and circulated throughout the British Empire. These coins would have included denominations such as shillings, pence, and pounds.

However, it's worth noting that during the colonial period, coins were relatively scarce in the Caribbean, and barter and trade were more common forms of commerce. The use of foreign coins, including Spanish reales and Dutch ducats, alongside British currency, was also prevalent in the region.

Overall, while there was no mint specifically for the British Virgin Islands during British occupation, British currency would have been used for transactions on the islands, reflecting the colonial ties between the Virgin Islands and the British Empire.

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